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August 11, 09

NEWS / Conspirator Sentenced to Life in Prison for the 2006 Murder of Federal Witness John Dowery


BALTIMORE, MD—U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz sentenced Darron Goods, a/k/a “Moo-man,” age 25, of Baltimore, today to three consecutive mandatory life sentences for the murder of federal witness John Dowery, announced United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein. On June 11, 2009, a federal jury convicted Goods and Melvin Gilbert, age 34 of the murder of Dowery and convicted Gilbert and James Dinkins, a/k/a “Miami,” age 36, of Baltimore, of the murder of Shannon Jemmison. The jury also convicted James Dinkins of the murder of Michael Bryant and a non-fatal shooting of John Dowery on October 19, 2005. All three men were convicted of conspiracy to distribute drugs and related gun charges.

According to testimony at the five week trial, from June 2002 to February 2007, Gilbert operated a drug distribution organization known as “Special” that sold heroin, cocaine and marijuana on the streets of Baltimore. The evidence showed that Goods and his co-defendants committed acts of violence to protect the drug organization and retaliate against and intimidate potential witnesses who interfered with drug operations.

Witnesses testified at trial that Gilbert knew that John Dowery was cooperating with law enforcement authorities in the federal investigation and prosecution of members of their drug distribution conspiracy. Gilbert and Goods shot and killed John Dowery on November 23, 2006 to prevent Dowery from testifying and providing information to federal law enforcement about drug trafficking by the members of “Special.”

On July 1, 2009, Judge Motz sentenced Gilbert to five consecutive mandatory life sentences, plus 40 years and sentenced Dinkins to four consecutive mandatory life sentences, plus 40 years. Co-defendants Tracy Love, a/k/a “Boo Boo,” age 24 and Tamall Parker, a/k/a “Mo-Mo,” age 23, both of Essex, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute controlled substances and use of a of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime resulting in death. They face a maximum penalty of life in prison on the murder charge and a minimum mandatory sentence of five years and a maximum of 40 years in prison on the drug conspiracy charge and are awaiting sentencing. Cornell Booker, of Baltimore, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute heroin and was sentenced on November 20, 2007 to 66 months in prison.

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein thanked the Baltimore City State’s Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy and Assistant State’s Attorneys Antonio Gioia and Lisa Goldberg, the Baltimore Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation for their assistance in the investigation and prosecution. Mr. Rosenstein commended Assistant United States Attorneys Debra Dwyer and Kwame J. Manley, who are prosecuting the case.

http://baltimore.fbi.gov/dojpressrel/pressrel09/ba081009.htm

 




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